A strange operator

In a previous post on using the Feynman’s trick for Discrete calculus, I used a very strange operator ( \triangledown ). And whose function is the following :

\triangledown n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{n^{\underline{k+1}}}{k+1}

What is this operator? Well, to be quite frank I am not sure of the name, but I used it as an analogy to Integration. i.e

\int x^{n} = \frac{x^{n+1}}{n+1} + C

What are the properties of this operator ? Let’s use the known fact that n^{\underline{k+1}} = (n-k) n^{\underline{k}}

\triangledown n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{n^{\underline{k+1}}}{k+1}

\triangledown n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{(n-k) n^{\underline{k}}}{k+1}

And applying the operator twice yields:

\triangledown^2 n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{n^{\underline{k+2}}}{(k+1)(k+2)}

\triangledown^2 n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{(n-k-1) n^{\underline{k+1}}}{(k+1)(k+2)}

\triangledown^2 n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{(n-k-1)(n-k) n^{\underline{k}}}{(k+1)(k+2)}

We can clearly see a pattern emerging from this already, applying the operator once more :

\triangledown^3 n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{(n-k-2)(n-k-1)(n-k) n^{\underline{k}}}{(k+1)(k+2)(k+3)}

\vdots

Or in general, the operator that has the characteristic prescribed in the previous post is the following:

\triangledown^m n^{\underline{k}} = \frac{n^{\underline{k+m}}}{(k+m)^{\underline{m}}} n^{\underline{k}}

If you guys are aware of the name of this operator, do ping me !

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