nth roots of unity : A geometric approach

When one is dealing with complex numbers, it is many a times useful to think of them as transformations. The problem at hand is to find the nth roots of unity. i.e

z^n = 1

Multiplication as a Transformation

Multiplication in the complex plane is mere rotation and scaling. i.e

z_{1} = r_{1}e^{i\theta_{1}}, z_{2} = r_{2}e^{i\theta_{2}} 

z_{1}z_{2} = \underbrace{r_{1} r_{2}}_{scaling} \underbrace{e^{i(\theta_{1} + \theta_{2})}}_{rotation}

Now what does finding the n roots of unity mean?

If you start at 1 and perform n equal rotations( because multiplication is nothing but rotation + scaling ), you should again end up at 1.

We just need to find the complex numbers that do this.i.e

z^n = 1

\underbrace{zz \hdots z}_{n} = 1

z = re^{i\theta}

r^{n}e^{i(\theta + \theta + \hdots \theta)} = 1e^{2\pi k i}

r^{n}e^{in\theta} =1e^{2\pi k i}

This implies that :

\theta = \frac{2\pi k}{n}, r = 1

And therefore :

z = e^{\frac{2\pi k i}{n}}

Take a circle, slice it into n equal parts and voila you have your n roots of unity.

main-qimg-6da134e3e5735a9fb92355d53f95e4ed

Okay, but what does this imply ?

Multiplication by 1 is a 360^o/0^o rotation.

drawing

When you say that you are multiplying a positive real number(say 1) with 1 , we get a number(1) that is on the same positive real axis.

Multiplication by (-1) is a 180^o rotation.

drawing-1

When you multiply a positive real number (say 1) with -1, then we get a number (-1) that is on the negative real axis

The act of multiplying 1 by (-1) has resulted in a 180o transformation. And doing it again gets us back to 1.

Multiplication by i is a 90^o rotation.

drawing-2

Similarly multiplying by i takes 1 from real axis to the imaginary axis, which is a 90o rotation.

This applies to -i as well.

That’s about it! – That’s what the nth roots of unity mean geometrically. Have a good one!

 

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Tricks that I wish I knew in High School : Trigonometry (#1)

I really wish that in High School the math curriculum would dig a little deeper into Complex Numbers because frankly Algebra in the Real Domain is not that elegant as it is in the Complex Domain.

To illustrate this let’s consider this dreaded formula that is often asked to be proved/ used in some other problems:

cos(nx)cos(mx) =  ?

Now in the complex domain:

cos(x) = \frac{e^{ix} + e^{-ix}}{2}

And therefore:

cos(mx) = \frac{e^{imx} + e^{-imx}}{2}

cos(nx) = \frac{e^{inx} + e^{-inx}}{2}

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \left( \frac{e^{imx} + e^{-imx}}{2} \right) \left(  \frac{e^{inx} + e^{-inx}}{2} \right)

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \frac{1}{4} \left( e^{i(m+n)x} + e^{-i(m+n)x} + e^{i(m-n)x} + e^{-i(m-n)x}   \right)

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \frac{1}{2} \left( \left( \frac{e^{i(m+n)x} + e^{-i(m+n)x}}{2} \right) + \left( \frac{e^{i(m-n)x} + e^{-i(m-n)x}}{2} \right)   \right)

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \frac{1}{2} \left( cos(m+n)x + cos(m-n)x   \right)
And similarly for its variants like cos(mx)sin(nx) and sin(mx)sin(nx) as well.

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Now if you are in High School, that’s probably all that you will see. But if you have college friends and you took a peak what they rambled about in their notebooks, then you might this expression (for m \neq n):

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(mx)cos(nx) dx \\

But you as a high schooler already know a formula for this expression:

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} \left( cos(m+n)x + cos(m-n)x   \right)dx \\

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(\lambda_1 x) dx + \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(\lambda_2 x) dx \\ 

where \lambda_1, \lambda_2 are merely some numbers. Now you plot some of these values for lambda i.e (\lambda = 1,2, \hdots) and notice that since integration is the area under the curve, the areas cancel out for any real number. drawing.png

and so on….. Therefore:

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(mx)cos(nx)dx = 0

This is an important result from the view point of Fourier Series!