Tricks that I wish I knew in High School : Trigonometry (#1)

I really wish that in High School the math curriculum would dig a little deeper into Complex Numbers because frankly Algebra in the Real Domain is not that elegant as it is in the Complex Domain.

To illustrate this let’s consider this dreaded formula that is often asked to be proved/ used in some other problems:

cos(nx)cos(mx) =  ?

Now in the complex domain:

cos(x) = \frac{e^{ix} + e^{-ix}}{2}

And therefore:

cos(mx) = \frac{e^{imx} + e^{-imx}}{2}

cos(nx) = \frac{e^{inx} + e^{-inx}}{2}

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \left( \frac{e^{imx} + e^{-imx}}{2} \right) \left(  \frac{e^{inx} + e^{-inx}}{2} \right)

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \frac{1}{4} \left( e^{i(m+n)x} + e^{-i(m+n)x} + e^{i(m-n)x} + e^{-i(m-n)x}   \right)

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \frac{1}{2} \left( \left( \frac{e^{i(m+n)x} + e^{-i(m+n)x}}{2} \right) + \left( \frac{e^{i(m-n)x} + e^{-i(m-n)x}}{2} \right)   \right)

cos(mx)cos(nx)  = \frac{1}{2} \left( cos(m+n)x + cos(m-n)x   \right)
And similarly for its variants like cos(mx)sin(nx) and sin(mx)sin(nx) as well.

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Now if you are in High School, that’s probably all that you will see. But if you have college friends and you took a peak what they rambled about in their notebooks, then you might this expression (for m \neq n):

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(mx)cos(nx) dx \\

But you as a high schooler already know a formula for this expression:

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} \left( cos(m+n)x + cos(m-n)x   \right)dx \\

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(\lambda_1 x) dx + \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(\lambda_2 x) dx \\ 

where \lambda_1, \lambda_2 are merely some numbers. Now you plot some of these values for lambda i.e (\lambda = 1,2, \hdots) and notice that since integration is the area under the curve, the areas cancel out for any real number. drawing.png

and so on….. Therefore:

I =  \int\limits_{-\pi}^{\pi} cos(mx)cos(nx)dx = 0

This is an important result from the view point of Fourier Series!

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On the travelling wave: An intuition

The aim of this post is to understand the travelling wave solution. It is sometimes not explained in textbook as to why the solution “travels”.

We all know about our friend – ‘The sinusoid’.

y = sin(x)

y becomes 0 whenever sin(x) = 0 i.e x = n \pi

Now the form of the travelling sine wave is as follows:

y= sin(x - \omega t)

When does the value for y become 0 ? Well, it is when

x - \omega t = n \pi

x = n \pi + \omega t

As you can see this value of x is dependent on the value of time ‘t’, which means as time ticks, the value of x is pushed forward/backward by a \omega .

drawing

When the value of \omega > 0 , the wave moves forward and when \omega < 0 , the wave moves backward.

Here is a slowly moving forward sine wave.

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